Category Archives: Announcement

OpenSym 2015 General Call for Papers (Submissions)

OpenSym 2015, the 11th International Symposium on Open Collaboration

August 19-21, 2015 | San Francisco, California, U.S.A.

http://opensym.org/os2015/call-for-papers/

About the Conference

The 11th International Symposium on Open Collaboration (OpenSym 2015) is the premier conference on open collaboration research and practice, including free/libre/open source software, open data, IT-driven open innovation research, wikis and related open collaborative media, and Wikipedia and related Wikimedia projects.

OpenSym brings together the different strands of open collaboration research and practice, seeking to create synergies and inspire new collaborations between computer science and information systems researchers, social scientists, legal scholars, and everyone interested in understanding open collaboration and how it is changing the world.

OpenSym 2015 will be held in San Francisco, California, on August 19-21, 2015.

This is the general call for papers and includes the

OpenSym is held in-cooperation with ACM SIGWEB and ACM SIGSOFT. As in previous years, the conference proceedings will be archived in the ACM digital library.

Research Track Call for Submissions

The conference provides the following peer-reviewed research tracks.

  • Free/libre/open source software research, chaired by Carlos Jensen of Oregon State University and Gregorio Robles of Universidad Rey Juan Carlos. This track seeks papers on all aspects of FLOSS. For detailed topics and the research track committee please see http://wp.me/Pezfy-IU.
  • IT-driven open innovation research, chaired by Ann Majchrzak of University of Southern California and Arvind Malhotra of University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. This track is devoted to research on the process of expanding research and development activities beyond the boundaries of single company structures. For detailed topics and the research track committee please see http://wp.me/Pezfy-J3.
  • Open data research, chaired by Carl Lagoze of University of Michigan. This track contributes to the increasing awareness on Open Data in research. For detailed topics and the research track committee please see http://wp.me/Pezfy-J5.
  • Wikis and open collaboration research, chaired by Kevin Crowston of Syracuse University. This track is dedicated to the science and application of wikis and open collaboration technology outside of the context of Wikipedia. For detailed topics and the research track committee please see http://wp.me/Pezfy-J7.
  • Wikipedia and related projects research, chaired by Claudia Müller-Birn of Freie Universität Berlin and Aaron Shaw of Northwestern University. This track addresses research specifically on Wikipedia and associated projects. For detailed topics and the research track committee please see http://wp.me/Pezfy-J9.

Research papers present integrative reviews or original reports of substantive new work: theoretical, empirical, and/or in the design, development and/or deployment of novel concepts, systems, and mechanisms. Research papers will be reviewed by a research track program committee to meet rigorous academic standards of publication. Papers will be reviewed for relevance, conceptual quality, innovation and clarity of presentation.

Authors can submit full papers (5-10 pages), short papers (2-4 pages), and research posters (1-2 pages). For more details on paper types please see http://wp.me/Pezfy-Je.

Submission deadline for all research contributions is March 29th, 2015.

Authors submit through EasyChair at https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=opensym2015. Submissions and final contributions must follow the ACM SIG Proceedings template found at http://www.acm.org/sigs/publications/proceedings-templates.

OpenSym seeks to accommodate the needs of the different research disciplines it draws on. Authors whose submissions have been accepted for presentation at the conference have a choice of having

  • their paper become part of the official proceedings, archived in the ACM Digital Library, or having
  • only a short abstract included in the proceedings (rather than the full submitted paper) in order to preserve future publication possibilities.

Doctoral Symposium Call for Submissions

OpenSym seeks to explore the synergies between all strands of open collaboration research. Thus, we will have a doctoral symposium, in which Ph.D. students from different disciplines can present their work and receive feedback from senior faculty and their peers.

Submission deadline for doctoral symposium position papers is May 3rd, 2015.

Authors submit through EasyChair at https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=opensym2015. Submissions and final contributions must follow the ACM SIG Proceedings template found at http://www.acm.org/sigs/publications/proceedings-templates.

More information is available at http://wp.me/Pezfy-Jh.

Industry and Community Track Call for Submissions

OpenSym is also seeking submissions for experience reports (full and short), tutorials, workshops, panels, non-research posters, and demos. Such work accepted for presentation or performance at the conference is considered part of the industry and community track. It will be put into the proceedings in an industry and community track section; authors can opt-out of the publication, as with research papers, but will still have to provide an abstract (less than one page) for the proceedings.

Submission deadline for industry and community track papers is April 19, 2015.

Authors submit through EasyChair at https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=opensym2015. Submissions and final contributions must follow the ACM SIG Proceedings template found at http://www.acm.org/sigs/publications/proceedings-templates.

More information is available at http://wp.me/Pezfy-Jh.

The OpenSym Conference Experience

OpenSym 2015 will be held in San Francisco, California, on August 19-21, 2015. Research, industry, and community presentations and performances will be accompanied by keynotes, invited speakers, and a social program in one of the most vibrant cities on this planet.

The open space track is a key ingredient of the event that distinguishes OpenSym from other conferences. It is an integral part of the program that makes it easy to talk to other researchers and practitioners and to stretch your imagination and conversations beyond the limits of your own sub-discipline, exposing you to the full breadth of open collaboration research. The open space track is entirely participant-organized, is open for everyone, and requires no submission or review.

The general chair of the conference is Dirk Riehle of Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nürnberg. Feel free to contact us with any questions you might have at info@opensym.org.

The general organization committee can be found here: http://www.opensym.org/os2015/organization/

OpenSym 2015 Preliminary Call for Papers

OpenSym 2015, the 11th International Symposium on Open Collaboration, will take place in San Francisco (the city itself) on

August 19-21, 2015

We are looking for research submissions on topics relevant to the established open collaboration tracks on

  • free/libre/open source software,
  • IT-driven open innovation,
  • open data,
  • open educational resources,
  • wikis and open collaboration, and
  • Wikipedia and related projects.

The research paper submission deadline is

March 29, 2015

Already now can we promise a most exciting line-up of invited speakers. The California Bay Area is rich on thought leaders and where else would they want to present their ideas and engage with a leading audience than at OpenSym? So get your papers ready! The OpenSym 2015 organizing committee is looking forward seeing you in San Francisco!

Call for Participation OpenSym 2014

OpenSym 2014 will start in a few days on August 27, 2014! Participants can expect a program full of research and community events, including open space, where participants get to form their own program and follow their interests. Four keynotes / invited talks will lead the program and set the stage for the breadth of research and practice of open collaboration:

Read more in the program overview pages and don’t forget to register for OpenSym 2014!

OpenSym 2014 will take place at Fraunhofer FOKUS in Berlin, Germany. We appreciate and would like to thank our sponsors, the Wikimedia Foundation, Google, Fraunhofer FOKUS, ACM SIGWEB and ACM SIGSOFT, and The John Ernest Foundation.

Initial Results from the Study of the Open Source Sector in Belgium

Title: Initial Results from the Study of the Open Source Sector in Belgium

Authors: Robert Viseur (University of Mons)

Abstract: The economy of FLOSS (Free and open source software) has been the subject of numerous studies and publications, particularly on the issue of business models. However, there are fewer studies on the local networks of FLOSS providers. This research focuses on the ecosystem of Belgian FLOSS providers and, more specifically, their geographical distribution, the activities, technologies and software they support, their business models, their economic performance and the relationships between companies. The research is based on a directory containing nearly 150 companies. This directory led to the creation of a specialized search engine that helped to improve annotation. The research also uses financial data provided by the Belgian Central Balance Sheet Office. The initial results of this study show a concentration in major economic areas. The businesses are more active in the services and are heavily involved activities such as infrastructure software and Web development, activities which were common in the early years of free software development. Services for the support of business software is also common. A first analysis of the graph of relationships between providers’ websites highlights the role that is played by the multinational IT companies, by FLOSS editors, by commercial FLOSS associations and especially by the Walloon centers of competence that offer vast training catalogs that are dedicated to FLOSS. This research opens up many perspectives for improving the automation of the company directory updates, the analysis of the relationship between enterprises, and the automation of the financial analysis of companies.

This contribution to OpenSym 2014 will be made available as part of the OpenSym 2014 proceedings on or after August 27, 2014.

Structured Wikis – Application Oriented Use Cases

Title: Structured Wikis – Application Oriented Use Cases

Authors: Stefan Voigt, Frank Fuchs-Kittowski, Andreas Gohr

Abstract: Structured wikis combine the flexibility advantage of traditional wikis with the possibility of presenting structures and relationships in a partly automated fashion. Such wikis can, for example, map process structures and thus support complex processes. Taking the ICKEwiki as an example, this paper examines the differences between traditional and structured wikis by presenting four different real-life sample cases.

This contribution to OpenSym 2014 will be made available as part of the OpenSym 2014 proceedings on or after August 27, 2014.

Investigating Incentives for Students to Provide Peer Feedback in a Semi-Open Online Course: An Experimental Study

Title: Investigating Incentives for Students to Provide Peer Feedback in a Semi-Open Online Course: An Experimental Study

Authors: German Neubaum (University of Duisburg-Essen), Astrid Wichmann (Ruhr University Bochum), Sabrina C. Eimler (University of Duisburg-Essen), Nicole C. Krämer (University of Duisburg-Essen)

Abstract: In open online learning courses such as MOOCs, peer feedback has been regarded as a powerful method to give elaborated feedback on weekly assignments. Yet motivating students to invest effort in peer feedback on top of existing work load is difficult. Students might give insufficient feedback or do not give feedback at all. Students’ hesitation to provide feedback might be related to the lack of visibility of spent effort during feedback provision. Alternatively, students might provide less feedback due to lack of perceived benefits. In this study, we investigated the effect of two incentive types on peer feedback provision on weekly assignments. In total, 91 students enrolled in a semi-open online course were announced to receive either (1) a peer rating on their feedback or (2) open access to assignment solutions or (3) no incentive. Results indicate that the incentive type did not affect feedback provision in general, yet it had an impact on the content of the feedback. Students receiving (1) a rating-feedback incentive wrote longer and more specific feedback in comparison to students receiving (2) an information-access incentive or (3) no incentive. Results contribute to findings from peer assessment research that students are more likely to provide detailed feedback if students feel that feedback is attended to. Furthermore, results inform teachers and practitioners on how to encourage students to provide peer feedback in open learning environments.

This contribution to OpenSym 2014 will be made available as part of the OpenSym 2014 proceedings on or after August 27, 2014.

Standing in Misunderstanding: Analyzing Boundary Objects’ Effectiveness in Innovation Communities

Title: Standing in Misunderstanding: Analyzing Boundary Objects’ Effectiveness in Innovation Communities

Authors: Marc Marheineke, Hagen Habicht

Abstract: In this paper we investigate the use of virtual objects for knowledge exchange in communities. Information systems provide a wide range of new (virtual) objects for community members which support non-canonical collaboration required for knowledge creation [4,23]. From a sociological perspective these objects are means to cross knowledge boundaries in communities [6]. In our study we extend this aspect by a technical perspective of how virtual objects effectively facilitate activities of knowledge creation. Media Synchronicity Theory [10] proposes how to best accomplish communication performance. It predicts that to achieve effective communication, the two primary communication strategies of conveyance of information and convergence on meaning need to be supported. Building upon this discussion, we examine the use of virtual objects in a dynamic process of knowledge creation. We will draw conclusions on how to appropriately use virtual objects for communication. Our empirical study is based on multiple cases [32] of knowledge communities. Qualitative data has been gathered from the participants of six focused group discussions conducted on a virtual whiteboard which comprises a media choice to interact in real time. The results detail information on the actual use (and not use) of virtual objects (media) for knowledge creation. Based on our findings we empirically confirm the core propositions of Media Synchronicity Theory. We conclude with managerial recommendations on how to employ virtual objects for increasing the effectiveness of dynamic processes of knowledge creation.

This contribution to OpenSym 2014 will be made available as part of the OpenSym 2014 proceedings on or after August 27, 2014.

An Open Source Software Directory for Aeronautics and Space

Title: An Open Source Software Directory for Aeronautics and Space

Authors: Andreas Schreiber (German Aerospace Center (DLR)), Roberto Galoppini (SourceForge), Michael Meinel (German Aerospace Center (DLR)), Tobias Schlauch (German Aerospace Center (DLR))

Abstract: In aerospace engineering, as well as in many other disciplines, many software tools are developed. Often, it is hard to get an overview of already existing software. Sometimes this leads to multiple development of software, if nobody is able to determine whether a software for a specific tasks exist already or not. Therefore, in companies and organizations there is a need for a directory of exiting software. The German Aerospace Center has built such a directory based on the Open Source software Allura, which is the base software that drives the Open Source hosting platform SourceForge.net. Allura has been customized to the needs of the aerospace domain. The result is a software portal for the aerospace research community, that allow to register and categorize software. It is intended to be used both for Open Source and proprietary software. Employees of the German Aerospace Center as well as the public can search for existing software. This reduces the amount of software developed twice and allows to get in touch with colleagues who developed similar software.

This contribution to OpenSym 2014 will be made available as part of the OpenSym 2014 proceedings on or after August 27, 2014.

What Do Chinese-language Microblog Users do with Baidu Baike and Chinese Wikipedia? A Case Study of Information Engagement

Title: What Do Chinese-language Microblog Users do with Baidu Baike and Chinese Wikipedia? A Case Study of Information Engagement

Authors: Han-Teng Liao

Abstract: This paper presents a case study of information engagement based on microblog posts gathered from Sina Weibo and Twitter that mentioned the two major Chinese-language user-generated encyclopaedias. The content analysis shows that microblog users not only engaged in public discussions by using and citing both encyclopaedias, but also shared their perceptions and experiences more generally with various online platforms and China’s filtering/censorship regime to which user-generated content and activities are subjected. This exploratory study thus raises several research and practice questions on the links between public discussions and information engagement on user-generated platforms.

This contribution to OpenSym 2014 will be made available as part of the OpenSym 2014 proceedings on or after August 27, 2014.

Hackers on Forking

Title: Hackers on Forking

Authors: Linus Nyman (Hanken University, Finland)

Abstract: All open source licenses allow the copying of an existing body of code for use as the basis of a separate development project. This practice is commonly known as forking the code. This paper presents the results of a study in which 11 programmers were interviewed about their opinions on the right to fork and the impact of forking on open source software development. The results show that there is a general consensus among programmers’ views regarding both the favourable and unfavourable aspects that stem from the right to fork. Interestingly, while all programmers noted potential downsides to the right to fork, it was seen by all as an integral component of open source software, and a right that must not be infringed regardless of circumstance or outcome.

This contribution to OpenSym 2014 will be made available as part of the OpenSym 2014 proceedings on or after August 27, 2014.