Open Access to Working Notes in the Humanities

Title: Open Access to Working Notes in the Humanities

Authors: Michael K. Buckland, School of Information, University of California, Berkeley, CA Patrick Golden, Ryan B. Shaw (Sch. of Information & Library Science, University of North Carolina)

Abstract: A web-based tool for making and sharing research designed for authors, curators, and editors in the humanities is described, editorsnotes.org. Notes are a varied genre not limited to annotations. The data for the tool is modeled as three kinds of records: Notes created; Documents cited; and Topics, headings for names and subjects. Structured records are needed for interoperability and sharing. Open access, sustainability issues, and how working notes can complement other infrastructure are discussed in a status report.

This contribution to OpenSym 2015 will be made available as part of the OpenSym 2015 proceedings (or companion) on or after August 19, 2015.

The Rise and Fall of an Online Project: Is Bureaucracy Killing Efficiency in Open Knowledge Production?

Title: The Rise and Fall of an Online Project: Is Bureaucracy Killing Efficiency in Open Knowledge Production?

Authors: Nicolas Jullien (LUSSI-iSchool, ICI-M@rsouin, Télécom Bretagne), Kevin Crowston (School of Information Studies, Syracuse University), Felipe Ortega, Dept. Statistics andOperations Research (University Rey Juan Carlos)

Abstract: We evaluate the efficiency of an online knowledge production project and identify factors that affect efficiency. To assess efficiency, we used the Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) modelling methodology. We apply DEA to data from more than 30 Wikipedia language projects over three years. We show that the main Wikipedia projects were indeed less efficient that smaller ones, an effect that can be attributed in part to decreasing returns to scale.

This contribution to OpenSym 2015 will be made available as part of the OpenSym 2015 proceedings (or companion) on or after August 19, 2015.

#Wikipedia on Twitter: Analyzing Tweets about Wikipedia

Title: #Wikipedia on Twitter: Analyzing Tweets about Wikipedia

Authors: Eva Zangerle, Georg Schmidhammer, Günther Specht (Databases and Information Systems, Institute of Computer Science University of Innsbruck, Austria)

Abstract: Wikipedia has long become a standard source of information on the web and as such is widely referenced on the web and in social media. This paper analyzes the usage of Wikipedia on Twitter by looking into languages used on both platforms, content features of posted articles and recent edits of those articles. The analysis is based on a set of four million tweets and links these tweets to Wikipedia articles and their features to identify interesting relations. We find that within English and Japanese tweets containing a link to Wikipedia, 97% of the links lead to the English resp. Japanese Wikipedia, whereas for other languages 20% of the tweets contain a link to a Wikipedia of a di erent language. Our results also indicate that the number of tweets about a certain topic is not correlated to the number of recent edits on the particular page at the time of sending the tweet.

This contribution to OpenSym 2015 will be made available as part of the OpenSym 2015 proceedings (or companion) on or after August 19, 2015.

Page Protection: Another Missing Dimension of Wikipedia Research

Title: Page Protection: Another Missing Dimension of Wikipedia Research

Authors: Benjamin Mako Hill (University of Washington, Department of Communication), Aaron Shaw (Northwestern University, Department of Communication Studies)

Abstract: Page protection is a feature of wiki software that allows administrators to restrict contributions to particular pages. For example, pages are frequently protected so that they can only be edited by administrators. Page protection affects tens of thousands of pages in English Wikipedia and renders many of Wikipedia’s most visible pages uneditable by the vast majority of visitors. That said, page protection has attracted very little attention and is rarely taken into account by researchers. This note describes page protection and illustrates why it plays an important role in shaping user behavior on wikis. We also present a new longitudinal dataset of page protection events for English Wikipedia, the software used to produce it, and results from tests that support both the validity of the dataset and the impact of page protection on patterns of editing.

This contribution to OpenSym 2015 will be made available as part of the OpenSym 2015 proceedings (or companion) on or after August 19, 2015.

Measuring the Crowd – A Preliminary Taxonomy of Crowdsourcing Metrics

Title: Measuring the Crowd – A Preliminary Taxonomy of Crowdsourcing Metrics

Authors: Eoin Cullina, Kieran Conboy, Lorraine Morgan (NUI Galway, J.E Cairnes School of Business & Economics, Newcastle, Galway, Ireland)

Abstract: Crowdsourcing initiatives benefit from tapping into diversity. A vast plethora of disparate individuals, organizations, frameworks and skillsets can all play a role in sourcing solutions to a challenge. Nevertheless, while crowdsourcing has become a pervasive phenomenon, there is a paucity of research that addresses how the crowdsourcing process is measured. Whereas research has advanced various taxonomies of crowdsourcing none to date have specifically addressed the issue of measuring either specific stages of the crowdsourcing process or the process as a whole. As a first step towards achieving this goal, this research-inprogress paper examines crowdsourcing at the operational level with a view towards (i) identifying the parts of the process (ii) identifying what can be measured and (iii) categorising operational metrics to facilitate deployment in practice. The taxonomy advanced is overarching in nature and can be deployed across disciplines. Furthermore, the preliminary taxonomy presented will offer practitioners a comprehensive list of metrics that will enable them to facilitate comparison across various crowdsourcing initiatives.

This contribution to OpenSym 2015 will be made available as part of the OpenSym 2015 proceedings (or companion) on or after August 19, 2015.

Open Innovation for Innovation Tools: the Case of Co-Design Platforms

Title: Open Innovation for Innovation Tools: the Case of Co-Design -Platforms

Authors: Albrecht Fritzsche, Angela Roth, Kathrin Möslein (Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nürnberg, Germany)

Abstract: This paper explores the dynamics of openness and enclosure of innovation activities with IT artifacts on the example of co-design platforms. While modern information and communication technologies offer many new possibilities for innovation, they also subject innovation to the underlying technical structures, which can misdirect the activities on the platform. In order to avoid this, we propose an open innovation approach for open innovation solutions. We perform an empirical study on two co-design platforms which become subjects of innovation themselves in an open laboratory in the downtown area of a European city. Visitors to the laboratory are allowed to engage in innovate activities regarding the co-design platforms in whatever way they want. The results show that they do not only address technical improvements of the platforms, but also look into new directions to make the platforms more relevant or to replace them by other ways of innovating in the given contexts

This contribution to OpenSym 2015 will be made available as part of the OpenSym 2015 proceedings (or companion) on or after August 19, 2015.

Toward understanding new feature request systems as participation architectures for supporting open innovation

Title: Toward understanding new feature request systems as participation architectures for supporting open innovation

Authors: Michelle W. Purcell (College of Computing & Informatics Drexel University)

Abstract: Most research regarding innovation in open source software communities pertains to identifying supporting conditions for promoting code contribution as a way to innovate the software. Instead, this paper seeks to identify social and technological affordances of new feature request systems and their potential to support open innovation through integration of peripheral community members’ ideas for advancing the software. Initial findings from the first of a planned study of multiple open source software communities are presented to identify attributes of effective participation architectures.

This contribution to OpenSym 2015 will be made available as part of the OpenSym 2015 proceedings (or companion) on or after August 19, 2015.

Public Domain Rank: Identifying Notable Individuals with the Wisdom of the Crowd

Title: Public Domain Rank: Identifying Notable Individuals with the Wisdom of the Crowd

Authors: Allen B. Riddell (Neukom Institute for Computational Science Leslie Center for the Humanities Dartmouth College)

Abstract: Identifying literary, scientific, and technical works of enduring interest is challenging. Few are able to name significant works across more than a handful of domains or languages. This paper introduces an automatic method for identifying authors of notable works throughout history. Notability is defined using the record of which works volunteers have made available in public domain digital editions. A significant benefit of this bottom-up approach is that it also provides a novel and reproducible index of notability for all individuals with Wikipedia pages. This method promises to supplement the work of cultural organizations and institutions seeking to publicize the availability of notable works and prioritize works for preservation and digitization.

This contribution to OpenSym 2015 will be made available as part of the OpenSym 2015 proceedings (or companion) on or after August 19, 2015.

 

On the role of FOSS business models and participation architectures in supporting open innovation

Title: On the role of FOSS business models and participation architectures in supporting open innovation

Authors: Michelle W. Purcell (College of Computing & Informatics Drexel University)

Abstract: Most research regarding innovation in free and open source software (FOSS) pertains to identifying supporting conditions for promoting code contribution. This raises concerns about the ability of FOSS communities to remain innovative based only on the perspectives of developer-users. Preliminary research suggests different open source business models may provide motivation to support greater involvement of non-developer users. This research focuses on understanding the relationship between business model and supporting participation architectures, beyond users’ code contributions, to enable user participation in design of the software.

This contribution to OpenSym 2015 will be made available as part of the OpenSym 2015 proceedings (or companion) on or after August 19, 2015.

Volunteer Management in Open Source Communities

Title: Volunteer Management in Open Source Communities

Authors: Ann Barcomb (Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nürnberg)

Abstract: Open source community management is largely ad-hoc and relies on practitioner guides. Yet there is a great deal of information about volunteer management in the general volunteering literature, open source literature and general volunteering guides which could be relevant to open source communities if it were categorized and validated. Bringing these di fferent sources of information together also reveals gaps in our understanding of volunteer management in open source which I hope to address.

This contribution to OpenSym 2015 will be made available as part of the OpenSym 2015 proceedings (or companion) on or after August 19, 2015.